Save Money with Summer Produce

  • Summer Savings

    Abundant crops of seasonal fruits often mean significant savings for grocery shoppers. That’s because there’s usually a big difference in the price of produce when it’s in and out of season. Here’s how much you could be saving this summer if you make the right choices at the store. Photo Credit: total Aldo
    Peaches
  • Peaches

    Peaches aren’t just sweeter and juicier in the summer; they’re much cheaper too. And this year, peach crops are plentiful. In fact, they’re so big that we’re sending them to India, according to produce news site Fresh Plaza. Peak season: June to September Peak season price: 99 cents per pound Off-peak price: $2.99 per pound Savings: $2 per pound Photo Credit: norwichnuts
    Nectarines
  • Nectarines

    These smooth-skinned cousins of peaches are mostly grown in California, according to the government’s nutrition information site, fruitsandveggiesmatter.gov. If they’re hard to the touch when you buy them, all you have to do is leave them out for a few days to ripen. Peak season: June to September Peak season price: 99 cents per pound Off-peak price: $2.99 per pound Savings: $2 per pound Photo Credit: La Grande Farmers' Market
    Plums
  • Plums

    Plums are also relatives of peaches, and while they’re known to stimulate bowel movements, removing their skin can prevent this effect, according to Discovery Health. The site also adds that plums’ flesh doesn’t actually get sweeter when you leave them out. Peak season: June to September Peak season price: 99 cents per pound Off-peak price: $2.79 per pound Savings: $1.80 per pound Photo Credit: rovingl
    Melons
  • Melons

    A variety of melons are in season during the summer, including the Galia, Casaba, Crenshaw, Canary, Santa Claus, Orange Honeydew and Sherbet. On average, each one weighs about 2 ½ to 4 pounds, according to produce company Melissa’s. Peak season: Mid-June to mid-August Peak season price: $2.99 each Off-peak price: $1.49 per pound, or about $4.84 each Savings: About $1.85 Photo Credit: Gato Zul
    Red Seedless Watermelon
  • Red Seedless Watermelon

    Seedless watermelons are popular in the summer. They’re easier to eat, and at 6 to 8 pounds each, according to Melissa’s, they’re fairly easy to carry compared to traditional gigantic watermelons. If you’re grocery shopping for one, however, a mini watermelon might be a better choice since they’re perfectly sized for a single serving. Peak season: July to September Peak season price: $3.99 each Off-peak price: 99 cents per pound or about $6.93 each Savings: About $2.94 Photo Credit: Waytru
    Red & Green Seedless Grapes
  • Red & Green Seedless Grapes

    There are more seedless grapes in grocery stores now than there are seeded grapes since they’re much more convenient to eat, but believe it or not, seedless grapes did contain seeds at some point, according to HowStuffWorks. Genetic mutations gradually keep the outer shells of seeds from hardening, and when that happens, a new grape plant can simply be grown as a clone of the existing one by cutting off a piece of that plant. Peak season: July to September Peak season price: 69 cents per pound Off-peak price: $1.99 per pound Savings: $1.30 per pound Photo Credit: mynameisharsha
    Red Tomatoes
  • Red Tomatoes

    Red tomatoes and other red fruits are rich in lycopene, a substance that’s thought to help prevent cancer and heart disease. They may even work as natural blood thinners, according to the World’s Healthiest Foods. Peak season: July to September Peak season price: 79 cents per pound Off-peak price: $1.99 per pound Savings: $1.20 per pound Photo Credit: mtcarlson
    Urban Food Deserts
  • Urban Food Deserts

    Poison-tainted produce seems to end up in low-income neighborhoods. Read on to find out more about this disconcerting trend and White House efforts to make healthy foods more affordable. Photo Credit: theogeo
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