A Secondhand Website for the Brokenhearted

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NEW YORK (MainStreet) — One new start-up is taking the concept of a resale service to the next level by targeting an unusual demographic: the heartbroken.

NeverLikedItAnyway.com encourages users to “shed the stories and the stuff” that inevitably get left over from a failed relationship, whether it be jewelry that was given as a gift or a dress that simply carries too many memories. In the process, the hope is that sellers can find a little solace and make some extra cash.

The idea for the service came when its anonymous founder “Miss B” broke up with her significant other the week before Christmas and realized she had a plane ticket for a vacation that she no longer wanted to take. Rather than just resort to the existing secondhand services, she brainstormed a new one that would focus solely on offering sentimental sales.

Browsing the site, one will find intimate goods (a diamond necklace with a heart on it, a one-of-a-kind bridal dress) and the generic (a case for a Mac laptop), yet each of these “breakup bargains” comes with a backstory. The diamond necklace was given by the seller’s “high school boyfriend whose intentions were always the best.” The wedding dress is sold by a woman whose fiancé broke up with her shortly before the wedding, leaving her “broke and brokenhearted.” Even the laptop case is described as coming from an ex-boyfriend who “was never a good listener” and bought it for the seller without realizing she didn’t even own a computer.

To put it differently, you’re not just buying a product, you’re buying a piece of someone’s grief. In essence, the service is like a combination of eBay and LiveJournal, which may just earn it the honor of being the most depressing place to shop on the Internet. That said, most items on the site are being offered for at least 50% off, so you should be able to find some decent deals if you can stop yourself from crying long enough to make the purchase.

Seth Fiegerman is a staff reporter for MainStreet. You can reach him by email at Seth.Fiegerman@thestreet.com, or follow him on Twitter @sfiegerman.

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