Is Your Child's Crib Being Recalled?


The death of two infants has resulted in a massive recall of cribs by Delta.

The risk of entrapping and suffocating infants has sparked a massive recall of cribs made by the children’s product company. Some 1.6 million cribs that were made between 1995 and 2007 and that use the drop side trigger lock design are affected by the recall.

The death of two infants sparked the recalls after an 8-month-old in Bryan, Texas suffocated as result of missing safety pegs that allowed her crib’s side to detach and entrap the infant the previous year. In July of 2008, a similar incident involving an 8-month-old boy resulted in suffocation after a safety peg failed, causing a side of his crib to detach.

The Delta Web site has posted diagrams of the crib drop side, and details about the voluntary action that save lives by supplying guidelines and ways to obtain additional pegs for cribs that are missing the component. The recall is the largest of cribs ever.

“We need stronger mandatory standards to ensure the safety of our babies,” Don Mays, Senior Director, Product Safety & Tech Public Policy, has stated. “If you are in the market for a crib, whether new or used, look first for ones that do not have drop sides. In the absence of strong standards, we do not have confidence in the safety of cribs with drop sides. If you already own a crib with drops sides, be extra vigilant about checking for loose or missing hardware."

Wondering if your crib is affected by the recall?
Consumer Reports has a list of cribs with model numbers on the blog. The list includes cribs with missing safety pegs and cribs with spring failures.

What to do if you own a recalled crib?
You can contact Delta for a repair kit at 1-800-816-5304 or visit the company's Web site to order a free replacement kit.

Wondering if your Crib is Safe?
According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, make sure it has a firm mattress, no cutout designs in the headboard or footboard, no corner posts over 1/16 high, no more than 2 3/8 inches between slats, and no loose or missing hardware or slats.

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