Hot Job: Animal Keeper at the Bronx Zoo

ADVERTISEMENT

Looking for a job? Here's a cool opportunity that just might be a great new start for the right person.

The position: Wild animal keeper for the Madagascar exhibit at the Bronx Zoo

Location: New York City

Job duties: The wild animal keeper be responsible for a broad range of tasks including providing daily husbandry, enrichment, training, observation and record keeping. The animals in this exhibit include birds, reptiles, amphibians, mammals and fish. The keeper may also assist with guided tours that provide information about the exhibit and its animals to zoo visitors.

The company: The Bronx Zoo is operated by the Wildlife Conservation Society, which also runs the Central Park Zoo, the New York Aquarium and several other popular attractions in the city.

Requirements: This role requires at least one year of recent, paid full-time experience involving the handling, feeding and care of animals in a zoo or similar setting. The Bronx Zoo will also consider candidates who have an academic year of full-time study in animal husbandry or a related field or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Applicants with a bachelor of science degree are preferred. The ideal candidate will have a degree in biology or a related field and/or experience in an Association of Zoos and Aquariums institution.

Extra perks: In addition to a full benefits package, this position offers the opportunity to interact with a wide variety of species of exotic wildlife on a daily basis.

Interesting info: The starting salary for this position is $34,912.

Other opportunities: The Bronx Zoo also has seasonal opportunities in NYC from March through October. The zoo is also offering opportunities for people interested in working in one of their global offices in 64 countries, with positions ranging from field research to conservation diplomacy.

Apply online here.

—For the best rates on loans, bank accounts and credit cards, enter your ZIP code at BankingMyWay.com.

Show Comments

Back to Top