Work and Social Media Harmed My Mental and Physical Health

NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- Last week, with the exception of a Monday appearance on CNN, I did not work. I did not use social media. I did not send, receive or check email. I only used the Internet to stream music and video and schedule exercise classes.

I was on "staycation."

I am not exaggerating when I say taking a week off -- the way I did -- was one of the best moves I ever made in my life. I learned a lot about myself as well as the efficacy of the routines and activities that had become daily habit.

In no particular order, here's some of what I learned:

Speaking of exercise, after attending Spinning classes five days a week religiously, I stopped going at the end of December. My excuse? Work.

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What a lame reason to end an exercise program. I love my job, but, honestly, the way I was going at it was counterproductive. It made me look cool to go on Twitter and brag about 16-18 hour days or being up at 3:30 in the morning working, but what did that accomplish other than occasional exhaustion, a couple extra pounds and a heart rate that stopped recovering as quickly as it used to?

A week ago this past Saturday, I went outside for a bike ride. What was once a warmup for me -- 15 miles at around 20 MPH -- beat the hell out of me. I came home pissed at myself. Quite simply, I had allowed my job to take away my fitness. Not the job's fault. All mine. And it's never going to happen again.

I was on the Spinning bike five times this past week. I will be on it at least that much this week and every week thereafter with few exceptions. It didn't take me long to fall out of shape. Thankfully, it still doesn't take me long to get back into shape. But I turn 38 years old in July so I expect that to change.

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