• Email
  • Print

5 Unhealthy Cities in America

BOSTON (MainStreet) — If you're trying to build abs that look like Matthew McConaughey's or a tummy as firm as Heidi Klum's, here's a look a five U.S. cities you definitely don't want to move to.

"These communities just don't have the [right] environment to support people who want to be physically fit," says Georgia State University's Walt Thompson, who oversees production of the annual American Fitness Index.

Compiled by the American College of Sports Medicine, the AFI grades the nation's 50 largest metro areas on a range of fitness factors, from obesity rates to how many residents walk or bike to work.

Thompson says cities with high AFI scores not only have healthy citizens, but also the infrastructure of parks, swimming pools and other facilities that help make physical fitness possible.

But he says those who want to get or stay in shape should avoid communities with poor AFI rankings. "You won't find the kind of environment that's going to help you," Thompson says.

The American College of Sports Medicine prepared the year's rankings using data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and other public and private agencies.

Each community's score represents the average of how it ranked on all factors that researchers considered (a city would have to come in first place in every area to score a perfect 100).

All health statistics refer to residents of a given community's entire metro area, but figures on the prevalence of local fitness facilities (baseball fields, swimming pools, etc.) only refer to those within city limits.

Read More:   health
blog comments powered by Disqus

Rates from Bankrate.com

  • Mortgage
  • Credit Cards
  • Auto

Brokerage Partners