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Renter's Insurance for Subletters: A Summer Real Estate Must

NEW YORK (MainStreet) – As thousands of college students exited cities like Boston, New York and Philly for the summer and have headed to apartments they are subleasing, the next step is to protect their belongings.

Ensuring that your clothing and expensive electronics are covered by renter's insurance is often overlooked by consumers who mistakenly believe that original renter or the management of the building covers any loss or theft.

Renters are 50% more likely to burglarized, but only 31% of tenants have renter's insurance, said Jim Hyatt, vice-president of personal lines at Arbella Insurance in Quincy, Mass.

Millennials and college students also tend to own expensive stuff including their tablets, smartphones, speakers, televisions and high-end clothing. Items that are left behind by the original renter won't be covered if they are damaged over the summer without renter's insurance.

The same goes for the new tenants - none of their personal belongings will be covered in the case of a fire or break-in.

Both the original renter and the subleaser need to get their own renter's insurance to cover their personal belongings, said Elaine Montgomery-Baisden, vice president of product management for Travelers in Hartford, Conn.

When you sublet, it is essential to have renter's insurance, especially if you are living in a neighborhood that you are unfamiliar with. Many people who sublet or rent in general mistakenly believe that should something happen to their possessions, the landlord is responsible for the insurance, Hyatt said.

"A good way to think about it is if you were able to lift up your apartment or house and shake it, the items that fall out would be covered under renter's insurance," she said.

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