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Market for Mortgage Sales Reps Looks Great, But Very Different

NEW YORK (MainStreet) — Each year, the news offers conflicting reports about the economy: It’s bad. It’s picking up. It’s crashing over the fiscal cliff. But for qualified salespeople, prospects are without a doubt looking in the mortgage industry, as well as looking very different.

Tim Padavic can explain. As vice president of business development for Providential Bancorp, where he’s in charge of sales and marketing, he knows a thing or two about getting hired in the mortgage industry — and about change, as his path to working in the mortgage business was anything but traditional. He worked his way up from founding an apparel company while still in college, stopping midway to transform a tanning salon franchise.

His message to aspiring loan officers is that in the digital age, location is no longer important. Salespeople can work from home. What companies such as Providential do put a high premium on is worker productivity and loan volume.

Providential was established in 1999 and like its rivals, suffered the pain of the real estate downturn starting in 2007. But the company survived the “great shakeout,” Padavic says, and came out of it with an innovative strategy for hiring in an industry not known for innovation.

“Management focused our efforts on a new business model,” Padavic says. “We’ve made amazing improvements in recruiting and operations through innovations in technology.”

The company's breakthrough: connecting its loan officers to customers only online. “Since most people shop for mortgages online anyway, this new approach is consistent with customers’ expectations,” Padavic says.

Read More:   real estate
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