The New American Dream: Retirement

NEW YORK (MainStreet) – A house in the suburbs with a white picket fence might sound old-fashioned because it already is. That’s one finding of a new survey that set out to define what the American Dream means in 2011 in a nation still struggling to recover from the recession and unemployment.

>> Video: Behind the Numbers of the New American Dream

By far the most important financial goal that American adults hope to achieve is something that previous generations often took for granted: having enough money for or in retirement. Almost half, or 47% of American adults, identified having enough money to retire or during retirement as their top financial goal, a number that should only grow if the current debt talks in Washington make good on legislators’ threats to cut Social Security payments.

Home ownership, the traditional cornerstone of the American Dream, was called a top financial goal by only 17% of American adults.

When asked to think about their own financial situation about whether or not they felt they were achieving their idea of the American Dream, 57% of American adults agreed, a comforting, if slender majority. Breaking that question down by gender though, the survey found that men are significantly more likely than women to feel that they are achieving the American Dream, with 62% agreeing, versus 53% of women. That means that either the gender gap affects a broad selection of financial health indicators, or that financial guru Suze Orman was right when she said that women may fake things in the bedroom, but “men fake finances.”

The survey, conducted online in June 2011 by Harris Interactive for MainStreet on behalf of the National Endowment for Financial Education, asked 2,257 Americans age 18 and up what financial goal they consider the most important to achieve in their lifetime and what they think is keeping them from reaching these goals.