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Cover Letter Clunkers to Avoid on Your Job Search

NEW YORK (MainStreet) — Looking for a new landing spot in your career?

Make sure your cover letter is in good shape, because you'll need it.

In fact, 91% of hiring managers consider cover letters "valuable" when vetting potential employees, according to a study last year from OfficeTeam. Another 79% say they expect cover letters with resumes from people applying for a job, even though many resumes are now sent online.

"Although the job application process has increasingly moved online, the importance of a cover letter shouldn't be underestimated," says Robert Hosking, executive director of OfficeTeam. "It often is the first opportunity to make a positive impression on hiring managers. It's also a chance to provide context for your resume, expand on key accomplishments and explain reasons for employment gaps or career changes."

Problems can start right up top on a cover letter, and often roll right through the rest of the document. Here are five of the biggest mistakes job applicants make when creating and submitting one:

Not taking instructions. Human resource managers are sticklers about following directions. If you can't handle the details, such as including a job requisition number in the email subject line or listing your salary requirements, your resume and cover letter may well be the first eliminated. Another tip: Address the hiring manager by name (and not by "To whom it may concern"). If you don't know the manager's name, call the firm and ask, or check the company's website.

Read More:   switching careers
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