5 Hiring Trends for 2014: What to Know Before You Send Out Your Resume

NEW YORK (MainStreet) — It's no secret that temporary and freelance positions have become a more permanent fixture in many offices, yet most companies show no signs of slacking when it comes to hiring full-time staff. Today, more companies offer flexible schedules in addition to work-from-home privileges, but will that continue? As workplaces navigate a complex picture of health insurance and benefits in 2014, new staffing trends are expected to emerge.

If you're looking for work in the New Year, check out our list of what to expect before you start sending out your resume.

1. Expect more flexibility of schedule and more flexibility to work remotely.

The concept of "free agency" has been around for a while, says Angela Hills, executive vice president of Pinstripe, a talent acquisition and management firm. But increasingly, workers are asking for — and getting — flexibility of schedule and flexibility in how they do their jobs.

"Millennials are used to learning new things by popping up YouTube, and they're used to working in a coffee shop," Hills says. "The workforce is changing, and the environment that they expect is changing."

Younger members of the workforce have an entirely different idea of what a "great career" looks like, Hills says, and companies are adjusting.

"Today's workers are coming from a different point of view; they saw their parents downsized after years of loyalty to a company, and they have a much different perspective on what a good job really offers," she says. "Businesses have been working and will continue to work to give them the level of flexibility they want."

2. Expect more contract positions, but with more discipline surrounding them.

Many organizations wouldn't even be able to tell you how many contractors they have on staff, but that will change in 2014, Hills says.

"Even great companies are suffering from a lack of visibility on what their costs for contract employees truly are," she says. "Smart companies are starting to look at what people's roles are, what roles are central to business and what roles may be so central to business that they might be better executed by ongoing, full-time employees."

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